Monthly Archives: May 2009

The Advisory Opinion Process in CT Special Education

Published on May 20, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

The IDEA requires States to provide Mediation opportunities to parents of children with special education needs to resolve disputes with their school districts.  In addition to Mediation, States can elect to offer other types of dispute resolution procedures as alternatives to litigating a Due Process Hearing, and Connecticut has incorporated a procedure called “Advisory Opinions” […]

Should I Hire a Special Education Advocate or an Attorney?

Published on May 19, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

I am often asked by prospective clients and parents of children with special education needs who attend workshops and speeches I give:  “I know I need some help at my child’s IEP meetings, but should I hire a special education advocate or a special education lawyer?”  It’s an excellent question, and in a very lawyerly […]

10 Tips for Starting a Special Education Law Practice, Part XIII

Published on May 18, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

The stakes are incredibly high when one is representing the interests of children with special education needs.  While I think it is a good idea to weigh the “pros and cons” of entering any field of practice, or any profession for that matter, my personal belief is that this particular calling requires more consideration, research […]

10 Tips for Starting a Special Education Law Practice, Part VII

Published on May 17, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

Update on CT Mandated Insurance Coverage for Autism Treatment

Published on by Jennifer Laviano

As many of you already know, Connecticut is one of many states considering legislation which would mandate insurance coverage of autism treatment.  I have written on this subject before, and it is something about which I care deeply.  You can read my full post on this subject here: http://connecticutspecialeducationlawyer.com/current-affairs/insurance-coverage-for-autism-treatment-lets-do-it-right/ I am happy to report that, […]

Unseemly IEP Team Member: “The Wily Fox”

Published on May 15, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

“The Wily Fox” From the perspective of a parents’ special education attorney, this is the most dangerous of all IEP Team members.   A Wily Fox is a person, usually a high level special education administrator, who has been studying the IDEA.  Often, they have attended a number of conferences on special education law, and sometimes […]

10 Tips for Starting a Special Education Law Practice, Part VI

Published on May 14, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

The stakes are incredibly high when one is representing the interests of children with special education needs.  While I think it is a good idea to weigh the “pros and cons” of entering any field of practice, or any profession for that matter, my personal belief is that this particular calling requires more consideration, research […]

Unseemly IEP Team Member: “The Lawless Renegade”

Published on May 13, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

“The Lawless Renegade” paper writer IEP Team Meetings can and should include a wide range of educational professionals.  Unfortunately, every once in a while they include a “lawless renegade.”  This is a person who either does not know about, or does not care about, the school district’s legal obligations under federal and state special education […]

10 Tips for Starting a Special Education Law Practice, Part V

Published on May 12, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

The stakes are incredibly high when one is representing the interests of children with special education needs.  While I think it is a good idea to weigh the “pros and cons” of entering any field of practice, or any profession for that matter, my personal belief is that this particular calling requires more consideration, research […]

Is There a Stigma Associated with Special Education Services?

Published on May 11, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

More than thirty years since the passage of the first federal law mandating special education and related services, the question lingers as to whether being found eligible for these services will “stigmatize” children.  I am asked this question on occasion by Parents, and I always provide the same answer: The real stigma will come if […]