Tag Archives: Special Education Law

Cherry Picking IEP Members

Published on March 15, 2011 by Jennifer Laviano

Despite nearly 15 years practicing special education law in Connecticut, there are still some old tricks which school districts employ which astound me.  Not that I am surprised that they continue to do it, but rather, that they think I won’t notice after all of this time. One of the oldest tactics is when special […]

IEEs: Do You Have to Explain Why You Disagree?

Published on February 14, 2011 by Jennifer Laviano

  As I have covered on several occasions in the past, a parent's right to an Independent Education Evaluation (IEE) under the IDEA is, in my view, one of the strongest available under the special education laws.  This opportunity to get a “second opinion” on the school district's evaluations is, in many cases, the difference […]

DON'T THROW AWAY ANYTHING!!!

Published on December 22, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Sometimes it's difficult to know what to to be happy about as an attorney who represents children with disabilities.  As you can imagine, the facts that support a “really great special education case” are, by definition, at best unpleasant, and at worst horrific. It's an odd feeling, reviewing a child's special education records.  When I […]

IDEA Hearings: A Hearing Officer’s View

Published on April 6, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

I have known of BJ Ebenstein for years, but only recently did I have the honor of getting to chat with her about the important legal issues that impact children with special education needs.  Since I have found in my Connecticut special education law practice that most parents have no idea what information is, and […]

Even a Broken Clock…

Published on March 25, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

One of the hardest things about being a parents’ special education attorney is that there are times where you realize that the success or failure of the child’s case may depend on how capable the parent is at testifying.  That’s a tough pill to swallow. But every once in a while, you have a moment […]

Connecticut’s Burden of Proof, Redux

Published on March 6, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Here we go again. Last Spring, I wrote about how parents of children with special education needs in Connecticut, as well as their advocates and attorneys, organized to successfully oppose efforts by school districts to switch the Burden of Proof in Special Education Due Process Hearings from the school district, who has the burden now, […]

The Day After Graduation

Published on February 24, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

custom essay order One of the greatest things I’ve discovered since starting this blog is that there are so many lawyers and law students interested in practicing special education law who are thirsty for knowledge about how to get started.  I had the distinct pleasure of being contacted by Attorney Matthew Stoloff last year as […]

A Simple Question, Well Placed

Published on February 18, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Whenever I am asked to present to public school educators or special education administrators on the subject of the rights of children with disabilities, I try to remind them that, in every profession, continuing education should be embraced and appreciated.  This is because I have found so many problems when teachers feel threatened by a […]

Paging Dr. Freud

Published on February 15, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

adobe software Dreamweaver CC to buy I guess I was due for a rant. First, I get a vile comment on the blog that likened Asperger’s Disorder to a fad, and further blamed a number of disabilities on poor parenting.  Thankfully, you, my loyal readers, jumped on board and shamed this yahoo with your reasoned […]

What NOT to Wear to Your Due Process Hearing

Published on February 10, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Many of my clients will ask me what to wear to their child’s special education Due Process Hearing.  As a matter of law, it should be entirely irrelevant to the proceedings what the parents of children with disabilities are wearing.  Impartial Hearing Officers are not saying “I found in favor of the school district because […]